NASA technology can charge an electric car in 5 minutes


In addition to range and price, recharging is one of the brakes on the development of electric cars. Even at a fast charging station, you now have to wait a little over twenty minutes to fill up the battery. But this blockage could soon disappear thanks to a new technology from NASA.

Called Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE), it would allow a full recharge in just five minutes.

An innovative cooling device

FBCE is a cooling technology developed in collaboration with Purdue University, Indiana. Created in the context of space missions, its role is to maintain certain equipment at the right temperature by eliminating heat. As an example, the US space agency cites ”
nuclear fission energy systems for missions to the Moon, Mars and beyond. ».

Like so many other space-oriented technologies, the FCBE could find applications on Earth, and in particular on electric cars. This cooling device could indeed help to remove the heat generated by an electric recharge, and thus reduce the charging time.

According to NASA, it is possible to reduce the charging time to five minutes if the charger is capable of transmitting a current of 1,400 amps (current chargers are limited to 520 amps for the most advanced). The problem is that such an intensity can cause overheating. And this is where the FCBE module comes in.

As NASA explains,
“A dielectric (non-electrically conductive) coolant is pumped through the charging cable, where it picks up the heat generated by the current-carrying conductor. »
Thanks to this technology, we can pass
“4.6 times the current of the fastest EV chargers on the market today, removing up to 24.22 kilowatts of heat. ».

The team led by Purdue University’s Issam Mudawar has also developed a charging cable capable of delivering 2,400 amps of current, almost twice as much as it takes to cut charging time to five minutes. .

Finally, the new technology looks promising. However, it can only be used with compatible batteries.

Featured Image: Rathaphon Nanthapreecha (Pexels)

Source :
NASA

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